Sessions

Our sessions provide a unique opportunity for attendees to learn key insights from a broad spectrum of experts and colleagues from around the country.

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To Be Announced

Session Title: Coming Soon!

School Climate & Culture Forum San Antonio

Larry Thompson, M.Ed: Defiant & Attention-Seeking Students: Unlocking Their Potential & Surviving the Process – Part 1

Thursday, November 14, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

Mike Paget, M.Ed – Positive Behavioral Supports with Students Who Are Wired Differently

Thursday, November 14, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

You know those students who make your day super difficult?  Those who exhibit an ongoing pattern of uncooperative or hostile actions – such as temper tantrums, fighting, cruelty and defiance?  Typically educators slip into a pattern of coercion and punishment. Non-disruptive peers start to reject them – isolating them and driving them to associate with other disruptive students. This path can lead to academic difficulties, poor relationships, substance abuse, delinquency and crime. But, these students may actually have a Disruptive Behavior Disorder – Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder and/or Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

In this session, author and behavioral consultant Mike Paget, M.Ed. will share effective practices for working with students challenged by these disorders in the classroom. He will examine each of the disorders – ODD, CD and IED – and connect the dots between the three. What does the student challenged by ODD think and feel about authority figures?  Mike will share practical accommodations that will reduce confrontation with these students. Attendees will learn why getting tough and zero tolerance do not work with students challenged by CD and IED. Discover how educators can avoid power struggles and not take the behavior personally.

Learning objectives:

Know the risk factors for and symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

Discover classroom accommodations and strategies for dealing with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

Gain strategies for de-escalating confrontational situations in your school or classroom.

Learn why it’s important to avoid lectures, interruption, yelling and arguing.

Learn to use more successful approaches including brevity, listening, neutral tone of voice, honesty and humor.

Discover how to build self-management through strength coaching, generosity and re-framing.

About the Presenter:

Mike Paget has over 25 years experience working as a “teacher-therapist”, special education teacher, director of clinical day program services, and state department of education consultant for emotional, behavioral, mental health issues, crisis de-escalation and prevention, and positive behavior supports.

Mike has biases; he believes that the most important “treatment” is a day during which a young person learns some new things, laughs with close friends, and contributes to making the day a bit better for classmates and community. He believes that teachers and parents are the primary facilitators for getting these things done.

Mike is now an independent trainer and consultant on topics related to emotional, behavioral, and mental health issues of students. He conducts workshops, seminars, and webinars across the United States and Canada.

Mike is the co-author of several books including
Aggressive and Violent StudentsDefying the Defiance: 131 Insights, Strategies, Lessons and Activities for Helping Students with ODDHigh on the Spectrum:
Asperger’s, and High-Functioning Autism & Related Personalities.

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC – Mean Girls Behind the Screen: Preventing Bullying, Cyberbullying & Relational Aggression

Thursday, November 14, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

Technology and social media play an increasingly large role in the social development of students today. Studies show that the average student (ages 7-17) spends up to 10 hours a day in front of a screen — cell phone, computer or tv.

Social media platforms have become critical for students who want to stay connected to peers — especially girls.  But as girls spend more time trying to stay “connected” online, they actually become more disconnected. Studies show a correlation between the amount of time spent on social media and personal life dissatisfaction. Girls often create elaborate identities and personas on-screen; but do you ever wonder what is going on behind the screen?  As girls experience the turbulent times of childhood and adolescence they often turn to social media to hide their fears, confusion and anxiety from the outside world. As a result, girls are twice as likely as boys to develop an internalizing disorder such as depression or anxiety by mid-adolescence.

Author Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC will help attendees better understand what is hidden behind the screen of “mean girls,” and gain tools and strategies for promoting the healthy development of confident, strong and happy girls.                                                                                

Learning Objectives:

•           Learn how social media affects brain development.
• Develop an understanding of how social media can impact mental health.
• Discover strategies to teach Netiquette: Send Means Said.
• Create a plan for effective communication in the digital and real world.
• Apply tools to address social media addiction

About the Presenter

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC is an award-winning author and international speaker recognized for her insight and understanding of relational aggression. She combines 15 years of practice in the fields of education and counseling with research, practical strategies and humor to address challenging behaviors and to build positive relationships with students. With experience as a classroom teacher, education consultant and international speaker, she holds a master’s degree in clinical counseling, focusing her efforts on adolescent and family issues.

In recent years, Stephanie has applied her passion for adolescents to focus on the dynamics of relational aggression, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior interventions. She is the author of Thrive in the Hive: Surviving the Girl’s World of Good and Bad Relationship Bee-haviors, Mom’s Choice Award-winning Princess Priscilla and the Bully-Bee Day, Princess Priscilla and the Mood Ring Rainbow and her latest Princess Priscilla and the Great Beezilla!

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC – Lost Boys: Navigating the World of Boys for Academic Successs

Thursday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00pm

Boys are held back in school twice as often as girls. Boys also get expelled from preschool nearly five times more often than girls, and they are diagnosed with learning disorders and attention problems at nearly four times the rate of girls. Boys are more likely to dropout of school, and make up only 43 percent of college students. Millions of boys are being lost along the path to academic success and career achievement in today’s knowledge economy. Teacher bias regarding behavior, rather than academic performance, penalizes boys as early as kindergarten. On average, boys receive lower behavioral assessment scores, and those scores affect teachers’ overall perceptions of boys’ intelligence and achievement.

Rather than penalize boys’ high energy – as traditional classroom methods often do – successful teachers are learning to take advantage of male liveliness, curiosity and thirst for competition. Unless educators stop to consider whether traditional methods are working for both genders, boys will continue to get the short end of the educational stick.

This session will helps educators understand the structural, chemical and processing differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. It helps educators support boys’ developmental needs, while teaching them social /emotional competencies. Attendees will discover innovative strategies, as well as group and individual interventions, to help boys achieve their highest academic potential.
                                                              

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn how to:

  • Explain how boys’ brains work including the chemistry and structure.
  • Identify the differences in the ways girls and boys focus.
  • Recognize the role of hormones, specifically testosterone and dopamine
  • Demonstrate classroom strategies to support boys’ developmental needs
  • Contrast the difference between natural aggression and bullying.

 

About the Presenter:

Steph Jensen, MS, LPC is an award-winning author and international speaker recognized for her insight and understanding of relational aggression. She combines 15 years of practice in the fields of education and counseling with research, practical strategies and humor to address challenging behaviors and build positive relationships with kids. She has held positions as classroom teacher, education consultant and international speaker. She holds a master’s degree in clinical counseling, focusing her efforts on adolescent and family issues.

In recent years, Stephanie has applied her passion for adolescents to focus on the dynamics of relational aggression, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior interventions. She is the author of Thrive in the Hive: Surviving the Girl’s World of Good and Bad Relationship Bee-haviors, Mom’s Choice Award-winning Princess Priscilla and the Bully-Bee Day, Princess Priscilla and the Mood Ring Rainbowand her latest Princess Priscilla and the Great Beezilla!

Larry Thompson, M.Ed: Defiant & Attention-Seeking Students: Unlocking Their Potential & Surviving the Process – Part 2

Thursday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

Mike Paget, M.Ed – Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder & Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Thursday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 4:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

Dr. Tom Maglisceau – Beyond Grit & Resiliency: Empowering Students for Success through Transformational Schools

Friday, November 15, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

Catava Burton, Ed.S – Trauma, NOT a D-Code Drama

Friday, November 15, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP – Self-Regulation Training: Framework for Success

Friday, November 15, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

Tracie Berry McGhee, M.Ed., LPC – I Define Me!

Friday, November 15, 9:00 am – 12:00pm

Description Coming Soon!

School Climate & Culture Forum San Antonio

Coming Soon!

School Climate & Culture Forum San Antonio

school climate conference school culture conference education educator teacher conference principal conference school counselor conferenc

To Be Announced

Coming Soon!

School Climate & Culture Forum Orlando

Coming Soon!

Las Vegas Pre-Conference Sessions will be held from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm on July 8 and 9:00 am – 4:00 pm on July 9. The main Conference will begin at 8:30 am on July 10, 2019.

Mike Paget, M.Ed: Positive Behavioral Supports with Students Who Are Wired Differently

Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Disorganization, irritability, intense moods, emotional escalation, anxiety, perfectionism:  these are some of the Top 10 Challenges faced by students who are “Wired Differently” – and by their teachers.  Supporting the increasing number of students (now estimated at 1 in 5) with emotional and behavioral challenges requires an array of practices beyond traditional discipline practices.

During this session, author and nationally known education consultant Mike Paget will provide an overview of some of the emotional and behavioral challenges confronting these neuro-diverse students. Increasingly, teachers, counselors, administrators and other educators are realizing that success for these students demands an emphasis on prevention, positive skill-building and other practical supports (including practices at the universal, secondary and tertiary levels) – and that these supports actually improve the behavior of all students. Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS) is one of the more prominent practices, but whether or not your school has implemented PBIS, this session will give helpful insights into the unique characteristics of these students and provide lots of practical supports that will help all students – but particularly those who are “Wired Differently.”

Learning Objectives

  • Discover the importance of adult attitudes & behaviors when using positive behavior supports.
  • Explore how primary, secondary and tertiary behavior plans can be best employed with various mental/emotional/behavioral concerns.
  • Understand the 8 elements of successful classroom management.
  • Discover tools to help teach social skills to students who are “Wired Differently” within the paradigm of positive behavior supports.
  • Understand the importance of collaboration between families, schools and community resources.

About the Presenter

Mike Paget has over 25 years experience working as a “teacher-therapist”, special education teacher, director of clinical day program services, and state department of education consultant for emotional, behavioral, mental health issues, crisis de-escalation and prevention, and positive behavior supports.

Mike has biases; he believes that the most important “treatment” is a day during which a young person learns some new things, laughs with close friends, and contributes to making the day a bit better for classmates and community. He believes that teachers and parents are the primary facilitators for getting these things done.

Mike is now an independent trainer and consultant on topics related to emotional, behavioral, and mental health issues of students. He conducts workshops, seminars, and webinars across the United States and Canada.

Mike is the co-author of several books including Aggressive and Violent Students,  Defying the Defiance: 131 Insights, Strategies, Lessons and Activities for Helping Students with ODD and High on the Spectrum: Asperger’s, High-Functioning Autism & Related Personalities

Steph Jensen, MS, LPC: Mean Girls Behind the Screen: Addressing & Preventing Bullying, Cyberbullying & Relational Aggression

Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Technology and social media play an increasingly large role in the social development of students today. Studies show that the average student (ages 7-17) spends up to 10 hours a day in front of a screen — cell phone, computer or tv.

Social media platforms have become critical for students who want to stay connected to peers — especially girls.  But as girls spend more time trying to stay “connected” online, they actually become more disconnected. Studies show a correlation between the amount of time spent on social media and personal life dissatisfaction. Girls often create elaborate identities and personas on-screen; but do you ever wonder what is going on behind the screen?  As girls experience the turbulent times of childhood and adolescence they often turn to social media to hide their fears, confusion and anxiety from the outside world. As a result, girls are twice as likely as boys to develop an internalizing disorder such as depression or anxiety by mid-adolescence.

Author Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC will help attendees better understand what is hidden behind the screen of “mean girls,” and gain tools and strategies for promoting the healthy development of confident, strong and happy girls.                                                                                

Learning Objectives:

•           Learn how social media affects brain development.
Develop an understanding of how social media can impact mental health.
Discover strategies to teach Netiquette: Send Means Said.
Create a plan for effective communication in the digital and real world.
Apply tools to address social media addiction

About the Presenter

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC is an award-winning author and international speaker recognized for her insight and understanding of relational aggression. She combines 15 years of practice in the fields of education and counseling with research, practical strategies and humor to address challenging behaviors and to build positive relationships with students. With experience as a classroom teacher, education consultant and international speaker, she holds a master’s degree in clinical counseling, focusing her efforts on adolescent and family issues.

In recent years, Stephanie has applied her passion for adolescents to focus on the dynamics of relational aggression, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior interventions. She is the author of Thrive in the Hive: Surviving the Girl’s World of Good and Bad Relationship Bee-haviors, Mom’s Choice Award-winning Princess Priscilla and the Bully-Bee Day, Princess Priscilla and the Mood Ring Rainbow and her latest Princess Priscilla and the Great Beezilla!

Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP: See My Pain: Using Trauma-Informed Strategies to Help Students Engaging in Self-Destructive Behaviors

Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Students cannot learn effectively when they are experiencing the effects of trauma. The impact of childhood trauma and chronic stress is an issue facing students, educators and society at large. However, when students are taught trauma-informed strategies, it raises the possibility of stronger resilience across many domains of life.

This workshop will help participants better understand how to respond to the effects of trauma — including self-injury and other self-destructive behaviors — using research-based, best-practice approaches. These strategies are designed to increase the ability to focus, improve emotional regulation, and empower students to engage in their own cognitive restructuring.

During this session, speaker and author Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP will teach innovative approaches educators may use in the school setting to create a wellness path for students, in and out of the classroom. These strategies are designed to help students understand and master their interpretations and choices — which will enable them to live more connected and powerful lives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand underlying reasons for these harmful and addictive behaviors.
  • Consider critical “do’s and don’ts” when responding to suspected or observed self-injury in young people.
  • Use research-based, best-practice approaches to self-injury.
  • Help young people acknowledge and address their own self-injurious behavior.
  • Use recommended creative-arts strategies and activities for helping children and adolescents who self-injure.
  • Understand the SMB Cycle and use Intervention Mapping.
  • Share suggestions and tips with parents and siblings of self-injuring young people

About the Presenter

Kaye Randall is a nationally known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger — as well as youth leadership and student empowerment. The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named Social Worker of the Year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), and 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children.

Steph Jensen, MS, LPC: Lost Boys: Strategies to Help Educators Navigate the World of Boys for Academic Success!

Monday, July 8, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Boys are held back in school twice as often as girls. Boys also get expelled from preschool nearly five times more often than girls, and they are diagnosed with learning disorders and attention problems at nearly four times the rate of girls. Boys are more likely to dropout of school, and make up only 43 percent of college students. Millions of boys are being lost along the path to academic success and career achievement in today’s knowledge economy. Teacher perceptions regarding behavior, rather than academic performance, penalizes boys as early as kindergarten. On average, boys receive lower behavioral assessment scores, and those scores affect teachers’ overall evaluations of boys’ intelligence and achievement.

Rather than penalize boys’ high energy – as traditional classroom methods often do – successful teachers are learning to take advantage of male liveliness, curiosity and thirst for competition. Unless educators stop to consider whether traditional methods are working for both genders, boys will continue to get the short end of the educational stick.

Award-winning author Stephanie Jensen will help educators understand the structural, chemical and processing differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. This knowledge will help attendees support boys’ developmental needs, while teaching them social /emotional competencies. Attendees will discover innovative strategies, as well as group and individual interventions, to help boys achieve their highest academic potential.
                                                         

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn how to:

  • Explain how boys’ brains work including the chemistry and structure.
  • Identify the differences in the ways girls and boys focus.
  • Recognize the role of hormones, specifically testosterone and dopamine.
  • Demonstrate classroom strategies to support boys’ developmental needs.
  • Contrast the difference between natural aggression and bullying.

About the Presenter

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC is an award-winning author and international speaker recognized for her insight and understanding of relational aggression. She combines 15 years of practice in the fields of education and counseling with research, practical strategies and humor to address challenging behaviors and to build positive relationships with students. With experience as a classroom teacher, education consultant and international speaker, she holds a master’s degree in clinical counseling, focusing her efforts on adolescent and family issues.
In recent years, Stephanie has applied her passion for adolescents to focus on the dynamics of relational aggression, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior interventions. She is the author of Thrive in the Hive: Surviving the Girl’s World of Good and Bad Relationship Bee-haviors, Mom’s Choice Award-winning Princess Priscilla and the Bully-Bee Day, Princess Priscilla and the Mood Ring Rainbow and her latest Princess Priscilla and the Great Beezilla!

Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP: Be the Difference: Growth Mindset Strategies for Creating Resiliency, Responsibility and Accountability

Monday, July 8, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Inspiring internal motivation for change with students can be challenging.  Enabling young people to see themselves as the authors of their lives and enabling them to live responsibly with accountability, kindness and compassion are some of the most critical life skills. When students choose a context of growth, they learn that the challenges of life may offer the greatest opportunities for that growth!  This workshop gives specific creative strategies for facilitating and maintaining the growth mindset context specific to the student’s social and emotional learning needs.

      

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn structures to allow students, faculty and staff to be outward-focused, to think about their choices and to realize their contribution in creating the results around them.
  • Understand how to effectively get results by choosing thoughts, feelings and behaviors from a place of ownership — using transformational distinctions of interpretation and context-setting.
  • Apply strategies for dealing with resistance and creating a context for change — both for students and the educators who serve them.
  • Incorporate the “Looks Like/Feels Like” model to help students manifest their natural leadership abilities and access their innate desire for accountability, responsibility, kindness and compassion.
  • Identify a context of healthy power and control.

About the Presenter

Kaye Randall is a nationally known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger — as well as youth leadership and student empowerment. The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named Social Worker of the Year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), and 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children.

Eric Clark M.Ed.: 25 Tech Tools Teachers Can Use to Enhance Engagement

Monday, July 8, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

For educators just getting their feet wet with technology integration to those currently using technology in the classroom, presenter Eric Clark will explore exciting 21st century tech tools that will increase student engagement and bring a wow factor into the classroom. One-to-one computing, BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), Smart Boards and other improvements have revolutionized the technology environment in many North American classrooms. Yet, many educators have lagged behind in incorporating that technology into their instruction resulting in classrooms that are not much different than they were 20 years ago.

In this seminar, Clark will draw upon his experience as a media teacher, media entrepreneur, administrator and master trainer to help teachers sort through tools they might find useful in their classrooms – while opening their minds to other ways to harness technology.

Session Highlights:

  • Poll Everywhere
  • Dropbox
  • TedTalk
  • Livebinders
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Powtoons
  • Lulu
  • Educreations

Learning Objectives:

In this session, you will learn how to:
•      Discern the value of reverse mentoring in a technology-filled classroom.

  • Discover innovative ways to store and manage lessons, files, and multimedia.
  • Integrate GarageBand and iMovie to create lessons centered on problem-based learning.
  • Learn how to use online video to support lessons rather than sustain them.
  • Identify different tools to help students become authors, producers, and creators of multimedia projects.   

About the Presenter

Eric Clark, M. Ed., is a Certified Master Trainer for Responsibility-Centered Discipline and helped shape the implementation materials for the program. He most recently served as Head of School at a progressive private school in the Midwest. Previously he served as Principal in a public school setting, while also serving as the District Technology Integration Specialist. Eric began his education career teaching English Language Arts, Journalism and Media Communications. Between his other responsibilities, he also launched a thriving publishing company. As an administrator, he has successfully implemented the supportive, non-exclusionary principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline with elementary, middle and high school faculty and students.

Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed., LPC: Girl Drama: Best Practices to Help Educators Reduce Relational Aggression, Cyberbullying & Emotional Violence

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Girl friendships are intense and all-encompassing from early elementary years on; but cliques, power struggles and an intense desire to belong create a ripe field for relational aggression. Describing the emotional milieu girls face as they grow, bestselling author Lisa Damour, Ph.D. reminds us that a girl’s “key support system – her tribe – consists of peers who are also as reactive and erratic as they will ever be. (She) works hard every day to harness powerful and unpredictable emotions so that she can get on with doing everything else she means to do.”

Teachers, counselors and administrators can help guide girls to define what makes a healthy friendship. As a family therapist and Founder of the SistaKeeper organization, Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed., LPC has focused much of her career on working with girls. In this session, she will discuss the impact of social aggression and the factors that motivate relational aggression. She will share tools to develop a trauma-free space to promote girl empowerment. The benefits of gender-specific programming that promotes strength and resiliency in girls will be explored. Discover tools for promoting pro-social behaviors like kindness, sharing and empathy in girls K-12, while improving their attitude toward school and reducing depression.

Learning Objectives:

  • Integrate the latest research-based insights into your bullying and relational aggression prevention program.
  • Identify online communication and social media trends affecting today’s girls.
  • Discover how to instill social/emotional connections among girls.
  • Implement individual, small-group and classroom strategies and activities.
  • Design or revise your own action plan for addressing female relational aggression.

About the Presenter

Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed. LPC, NCC founded the SistaKeeper Empowerment Center in St. Louis 12 years ago with the mission of inspiring and developing the mind, body and spirit of young women. SistaKeeper has since spread to other locations within the United States, as well as to Europe, Africa and the Caribbean.

Tracie continues to serve the community via her private counseling practice, which specializes in women and teen girl issues. She is often called upon to keynote on topics such as conflict resolution, dealing with low self-esteem and bullying. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the Delta Sigma Theta “Power of 22 Award,” the African American Professional Organization of Women “Women of Distinction Award,” the Girls Scouts “Women of Distinction in Social Services Award,” the NAACP “Hometown Champion Award” and the University of Missouri “Outstanding Achievement and Meritorious Service to Education Award.” Tracie is the author of SistaKeeper: Poetry for the Soul, I’m a Keeper and OWN Your NOW.

Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP: Self- Regulation Training: Framework for Success

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

When a student can’t read, we teach him how. When a student struggles with algebra, we give her skills to help. When a student has trouble behaving, what do we do?

Self-Regulation skills can be taught. Not all students have the same ability to regulate emotions, behaviors and responses to difficulties. And those who have not mastered Self-Regulation can be very disruptive to instruction time. When educators include lessons on Self-Regulation as part of the curriculum, everyone can benefit from the training on how to recognize triggers and how to manage responses to them. Rather than trying to modify behavior and/or removing the stimuli that results in unacceptable behavior, Self-Regulation training gives students control over their responses.

During this insightful session Brad Chapin will share strategies that have helped students develop skills necessary for success in academic performance, relationships and overall wellness.  Brad will demonstrate that personal responsibility for behaviors and self-discipline are stronger predictors of academic success than IQ.

Learning Objective:

  •        Engaging approaches to use with individual students and the entire class that you can employ immediately
    •        How to give students the tools to manage their behavior by recognizing triggers and  controlling how they respond
    •        The 3 skill-training areas
    •        To target the core and address a broad spectrum of behaviors and performance issues
    •        How Self-Regulation skills affect social interactions, academic and athletic performance, aggressive behaviors, physical wellness and future happiness and success
    •        How to incorporate Self-Regulation training into your classroom curriculum.

About the Presenter

Brad Chapin is a leading authority on Self-Regulation and a masters level psychologist with a passion for helping others learn the skills necessary for success and happiness. He is a best-selling author and nationally-recognized speaker in the area of Self-Regulation. He has served as the Director of Child and Adult Community Services for a large community mental health center where he supervised 65 mental health field staff. Currently, Brad is Director of Clinical Services for Stormont-Vail Behavioral Health Services. Brad’s first book, Helping Young People Learn Self-Regulation, is in its second printing. He has since published Helping Teens Learn Self-Regulation, The Legend of the Regulators, Teaching Self-Regulation Smart Guidance DVD and the Self-Regulation Training Board. His latest book, Helping Pre-Schoolers Learn Self-Regulation, was released to critical acclaim in 2016.

Sold Out! Brian Mendler: Motivating & Managing Hard to Reach, Uninterested and Disruptive Students

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

From the co-author of the international best-selling book, Discipline with Dignity, this session is loaded with strategies, techniques and ideas designed to prevent motivation and discipline problems in the most difficult classrooms. Discover and practice specific strategies and techniques designed to change attitudes and ignite a passion for success.  This practical, informative session will transform the lives of your most disruptive students.

Objectives:

  • Recognize underlying causes of student misbehavior.
  • Identify 3 places to build relationships.
  • Describe merits of values vs. rules.
  • Demonstrate 8 steps to defusing explosive situations with any student.

About the Presenter

Brian Mendler trains tens of thousands of educators a year and is a highly regarded dynamic speaker. Through his affiliation with Teacher Learning Center, he provides staff development training for K-12 educators and youth service workers throughout the world with a focus on how to be successful with even the most difficult students.

Brian is a certified K-12 and special education teacher with extensive experience working with challenging students in general ed, self-contained and inclusion settings.  In his training sessions and books, he draws on his own experience as a very disruptive student with severe undiagnosed ADHD and reading difficulties.

Brian is the author of several books including That One Kid and The Taming of the Crew.  He has also co-authored Strategies for Successful Classroom Management, Power Struggles 2nd Edition, and the bestseller Discipline With Dignity 3rd Edition: New Challenges, New Solutions.

Rick Shaw: First Preventers’ Playbook: Instrumental Strategies to Create a School Culture of Preventing Safety Issues

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Are you tired of the mounting violence in schools today? Are you scared First Responders/SROs can’t be everywhere and respond fast enough to save your students?  Would you like to know how research-based data proves you can prevent school shootings, violence, bullying, suicides, and other incidents? What if evidence-based data showed you how assets you already have, your First Preventers, can make your school and community safer?

In this session we will share extensive research-based data from real-life incidents/tragedies to show how prevention was and is possible. We will also share how schools with community-wide strategies are successfully preventing incidents, tragedies, and lawsuits by connecting the dots and changing lives and the world forever.

Learning Objectives:

In this session, participants will learn about topics that include, but are not limited to:

Learning Objectives;

  • Identify specific gaps in connecting the pieces of the puzzle
  • Utilize best practices to prevent liability, lawsuits and tragedies
  • Demonstrate the essential steps in intervention and prevention

 

About the Presenter

Rick Shaw is the Founder, CEO and CDO of Awareity Inc. – a developer of innovative, web-based and award-winning prevention platform for students, employees and communities. He has more than 20 years of experience performing numerous types of assessments (threat, compliance, physical, information security, social media and others), with a focus on prevention processes across multiple industries and types of threats. Rick’s experiences – combined with extensive research using post-event reports, lawsuits and surveys – has helped expose the most dangerous disconnects and potential liabilities facing schools (including new threats related to social media).

 

In addition to working with organizational leaders, Rick has been called upon to speak at numerous conferences in the United States, Canada, South Korea and Japan for his expertise in safety (student, employee, third-party, community, etc.) and prevention. He utilizes evidence-based data from hundreds of post-event reports and extensive research to expose each point where proper preventive tactics were possible in most incidents and tragedies.

 

Rick’s passion is student and child safety, and he leads an extensive research effort at Awareity to help educational leaders understand the need for comprehensive and proven prevention solutions to improve student safety and to prevent escalating consequences related to sexual abuse, bullying, cyberbullying, campus violence, suicide, human trafficking, homegrown terrorism and alcohol/drug abuse.

 

Repeat Session! Eric Clark, M.Ed.: Supportive Discipline: Teaching Students to “Own” Their Behaviors

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Many schools fail to see lasting improvement in student behavior because students have not been “encouraged” to accept responsibility for their own actions. Instead students often find ways to project the responsibility for their behaviors to other students — or to their teachers.  This session will help educators to develop a plan, and learn the necessary skills, to create a culture of self-responsibility.

 

Working with difficult, demanding, and disruptive students is not a new challenge for educators. Even well-seasoned, award-winning educators can sometimes “lose their cool” with certain students in certain situations.  Using the principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline, this session will help teachers and administrators identify and address challenging behaviors that negatively affect the academic and behavioral progress of the students with whom they work. This insight-filled workshop will provide you with up-to-date insights and strategies for reaching and helping students who evoke the strongest feelings of frustration and sometimes discouragement, in professional educators.                                                                               

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn to:
•          Identify the underlying causes of difficult behaviors in students

  • Implement do’s and don’ts to address specific behaviors
  • Integrate key strategies for migrating from an obedience-centered approach to a responsibility-centered approach
  • Develop innovative ways to support positive behavior
  • Apply strategies for preventing the escalation of difficult behavior

 

About the Presenter

Eric Clark, M. Ed., is a Certified Master Trainer for Responsibility-Centered Discipline and helped shape the implementation materials for the program. He most recently served as Head of School at a progressive private school in the Midwest. Previously he served as Principal in a public school setting, while also serving at the District Technology Integration Specialist. Eric began his education career teaching English Language Arts, Journalism and Media Communications. Between his other responsibilities, he also launched a thriving publishing company. As an administrator, he has successfully implemented the supportive, non-exclusionary principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline with elementary, middle and high school faculty and students.

 

 

Repeat Session! Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP: Self- Regulation Training: Framework for Success

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

When a student can’t read, we teach him how. When a student struggles with algebra, we give her skills to help. When a student has trouble behaving, what do we do?

Self-Regulation skills can be taught. Not all students have the same ability to regulate emotions, behaviors and responses to difficulties. And those who have not mastered Self-Regulation can be very disruptive to instruction time. When educators include lessons on Self-Regulation as part of the curriculum, everyone can benefit from the training on how to recognize triggers and how to manage responses to them. Rather than trying to modify behavior and/or removing the stimuli that results in unacceptable behavior, Self-Regulation training gives students control over their responses.

During this insightful session Brad Chapin will share strategies that have helped students develop skills necessary for success in academic performance, relationships and overall wellness.  Brad will demonstrate that personal responsibility for behaviors and self-discipline are stronger predictors of academic success than IQ.

Learning Objective:

  •        Engaging approaches to use with individual students and the entire class that you can employ immediately
    •        How to give students the tools to manage their behavior by recognizing triggers and  controlling how they respond
    •        The 3 skill-training areas
    •        To target the core and address a broad spectrum of behaviors and performance issues
    •        How Self-Regulation skills affect social interactions, academic and athletic performance, aggressive behaviors, physical wellness and future happiness and success
    •        How to incorporate Self-Regulation training into your classroom curriculum.

About the Presenter

Brad Chapin is a leading authority on Self-Regulation and a masters level psychologist with a passion for helping others learn the skills necessary for success and happiness. He is a best-selling author and nationally-recognized speaker in the area of Self-Regulation. He has served as the Director of Child and Adult Community Services for a large community mental health center where he supervised 65 mental health field staff. Currently, Brad is Director of Clinical Services for Stormont-Vail Behavioral Health Services. Brad’s first book, Helping Young People Learn Self-Regulation, is in its second printing. He has since published Helping Teens Learn Self-Regulation, The Legend of the Regulators, Teaching Self-Regulation Smart Guidance DVD and the Self-Regulation Training Board. His latest book, Helping Pre-Schoolers Learn Self-Regulation, was released to critical acclaim in 2016.

Robert Jackson: Salvaging Our Sons: Helping Educators Reach, Teach and Empower Young Men

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Session Description Coming Soon!

Sold Out! Eric Clark, M.Ed.: Supportive Discipline: Teaching Students to “Own” Their Behaviors

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Many schools fail to see lasting improvement in student behavior because students have not been “encouraged” to accept responsibility for their own actions. Instead students often find ways to project the responsibility for their behaviors to other students — or to their teachers.  This session will help educators to develop a plan, and learn the necessary skills, to create a culture of self-responsibility.

 

Working with difficult, demanding, and disruptive students is not a new challenge for educators. Even well-seasoned, award-winning educators can sometimes “lose their cool” with certain students in certain situations.  Using the principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline, this session will help teachers and administrators identify and address challenging behaviors that negatively affect the academic and behavioral progress of the students with whom they work. This insight-filled workshop will provide you with up-to-date insights and strategies for reaching and helping students who evoke the strongest feelings of frustration and sometimes discouragement, in professional educators.                                                                               

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn to:
•          Identify the underlying causes of difficult behaviors in students

  • Implement do’s and don’ts to address specific behaviors
  • Integrate key strategies for migrating from an obedience-centered approach to a responsibility-centered approach
  • Develop innovative ways to support positive behavior
  • Apply strategies for preventing the escalation of difficult behavior

 

About the Presenter

Eric Clark, M. Ed., is a Certified Master Trainer for Responsibility-Centered Discipline and helped shape the implementation materials for the program. He most recently served as Head of School at a progressive private school in the Midwest. Previously he served as Principal in a public school setting, while also serving at the District Technology Integration Specialist. Eric began his education career teaching English Language Arts, Journalism and Media Communications. Between his other responsibilities, he also launched a thriving publishing company. As an administrator, he has successfully implemented the supportive, non-exclusionary principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline with elementary, middle and high school faculty and students.

 

 

Sold Out! Susan Coleman, Ph.D.: Stay Classy! Using Social Emotional Learning Competencies to Create Alternatives to Suspensio

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Session Description Coming Soon!

Mike Paget, M.Ed.: Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Insights and Strategies that will Improve Outcomes for Students with ODD, Conduct Disorders and Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Between 2 and 16% of students have behaviors that disrupt their day, the efforts of their teachers, and the focus of their peers. This session will review where these patterns come from, what makes them worse, and strategies to provide a calmer, more productive school climate.                                                               

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn how to:

  • Learn what’s wrong with these students. Understand where resistant, defiant, hostile, manipulative, aggressive, and hurtful behaviors come from.
  • Common tactics that escalate negative behaviors.
  • Keeping your cool: How to prevent and respond in ways that improve your chances
  • Moving from problem to asset: Strategies to find and nurture hidden strengths in the most challenging student

About the Presenter

Mike Paget has over 25 years experience working as a “teacher-therapist”, special education teacher, director of clinical day program services, and state department of education consultant for emotional, behavioral, mental health issues, crisis de-escalation and prevention, and positive behavior supports.

Mike has biases; he believes that the most important “treatment” is a day during which a young person learns some new things, laughs with close friends, and contributes to making the day a bit better for classmates and community. He believes that teachers and parents are the primary facilitators for getting these things done.

Mike is now an independent trainer and consultant on topics related to emotional, behavioral, and mental health issues of students. He conducts workshops, seminars, and webinars across the United States and Canada.

Mike is the co-author of several books including:

Aggressive and Violent StudentsDefying the Defiance: 131 Insights, Strategies, Lessons and Activities for Helping Students with ODD, and High on the Spectrum: Asperger’s, High-Functioning Autism & Related Personalities

School Climate & Culture Forum Orlando

School Climate & Culture Forum Orlando

School Climate & Culture Forum Atlanta

school climate conference school culture conference education educator teacher conference principal conference school counselor conferenc

To Be Announced

Coming Soon!

School Climate & Culture Forum Atlanta

Coming Soon!

Las Vegas Pre-Conference Sessions will be held from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm on July 8 and 9:00 am – 4:00 pm on July 9. The main Conference will begin at 8:30 am on July 10, 2019.

Mike Paget, M.Ed: Positive Behavioral Supports with Students Who Are Wired Differently

Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Disorganization, irritability, intense moods, emotional escalation, anxiety, perfectionism:  these are some of the Top 10 Challenges faced by students who are “Wired Differently” – and by their teachers.  Supporting the increasing number of students (now estimated at 1 in 5) with emotional and behavioral challenges requires an array of practices beyond traditional discipline practices.

During this session, author and nationally known education consultant Mike Paget will provide an overview of some of the emotional and behavioral challenges confronting these neuro-diverse students. Increasingly, teachers, counselors, administrators and other educators are realizing that success for these students demands an emphasis on prevention, positive skill-building and other practical supports (including practices at the universal, secondary and tertiary levels) – and that these supports actually improve the behavior of all students. Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS) is one of the more prominent practices, but whether or not your school has implemented PBIS, this session will give helpful insights into the unique characteristics of these students and provide lots of practical supports that will help all students – but particularly those who are “Wired Differently.”

Learning Objectives

  • Discover the importance of adult attitudes & behaviors when using positive behavior supports.
  • Explore how primary, secondary and tertiary behavior plans can be best employed with various mental/emotional/behavioral concerns.
  • Understand the 8 elements of successful classroom management.
  • Discover tools to help teach social skills to students who are “Wired Differently” within the paradigm of positive behavior supports.
  • Understand the importance of collaboration between families, schools and community resources.

About the Presenter

Mike Paget has over 25 years experience working as a “teacher-therapist”, special education teacher, director of clinical day program services, and state department of education consultant for emotional, behavioral, mental health issues, crisis de-escalation and prevention, and positive behavior supports.

Mike has biases; he believes that the most important “treatment” is a day during which a young person learns some new things, laughs with close friends, and contributes to making the day a bit better for classmates and community. He believes that teachers and parents are the primary facilitators for getting these things done.

Mike is now an independent trainer and consultant on topics related to emotional, behavioral, and mental health issues of students. He conducts workshops, seminars, and webinars across the United States and Canada.

Mike is the co-author of several books including Aggressive and Violent Students,  Defying the Defiance: 131 Insights, Strategies, Lessons and Activities for Helping Students with ODD and High on the Spectrum: Asperger’s, High-Functioning Autism & Related Personalities

Steph Jensen, MS, LPC: Mean Girls Behind the Screen: Addressing & Preventing Bullying, Cyberbullying & Relational Aggression

Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Technology and social media play an increasingly large role in the social development of students today. Studies show that the average student (ages 7-17) spends up to 10 hours a day in front of a screen — cell phone, computer or tv.

Social media platforms have become critical for students who want to stay connected to peers — especially girls.  But as girls spend more time trying to stay “connected” online, they actually become more disconnected. Studies show a correlation between the amount of time spent on social media and personal life dissatisfaction. Girls often create elaborate identities and personas on-screen; but do you ever wonder what is going on behind the screen?  As girls experience the turbulent times of childhood and adolescence they often turn to social media to hide their fears, confusion and anxiety from the outside world. As a result, girls are twice as likely as boys to develop an internalizing disorder such as depression or anxiety by mid-adolescence.

Author Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC will help attendees better understand what is hidden behind the screen of “mean girls,” and gain tools and strategies for promoting the healthy development of confident, strong and happy girls.                                                                                

Learning Objectives:

•           Learn how social media affects brain development.
Develop an understanding of how social media can impact mental health.
Discover strategies to teach Netiquette: Send Means Said.
Create a plan for effective communication in the digital and real world.
Apply tools to address social media addiction

About the Presenter

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC is an award-winning author and international speaker recognized for her insight and understanding of relational aggression. She combines 15 years of practice in the fields of education and counseling with research, practical strategies and humor to address challenging behaviors and to build positive relationships with students. With experience as a classroom teacher, education consultant and international speaker, she holds a master’s degree in clinical counseling, focusing her efforts on adolescent and family issues.

In recent years, Stephanie has applied her passion for adolescents to focus on the dynamics of relational aggression, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior interventions. She is the author of Thrive in the Hive: Surviving the Girl’s World of Good and Bad Relationship Bee-haviors, Mom’s Choice Award-winning Princess Priscilla and the Bully-Bee Day, Princess Priscilla and the Mood Ring Rainbow and her latest Princess Priscilla and the Great Beezilla!

Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP: See My Pain: Using Trauma-Informed Strategies to Help Students Engaging in Self-Destructive Behaviors

Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Students cannot learn effectively when they are experiencing the effects of trauma. The impact of childhood trauma and chronic stress is an issue facing students, educators and society at large. However, when students are taught trauma-informed strategies, it raises the possibility of stronger resilience across many domains of life.

This workshop will help participants better understand how to respond to the effects of trauma — including self-injury and other self-destructive behaviors — using research-based, best-practice approaches. These strategies are designed to increase the ability to focus, improve emotional regulation, and empower students to engage in their own cognitive restructuring.

During this session, speaker and author Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP will teach innovative approaches educators may use in the school setting to create a wellness path for students, in and out of the classroom. These strategies are designed to help students understand and master their interpretations and choices — which will enable them to live more connected and powerful lives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand underlying reasons for these harmful and addictive behaviors.
  • Consider critical “do’s and don’ts” when responding to suspected or observed self-injury in young people.
  • Use research-based, best-practice approaches to self-injury.
  • Help young people acknowledge and address their own self-injurious behavior.
  • Use recommended creative-arts strategies and activities for helping children and adolescents who self-injure.
  • Understand the SMB Cycle and use Intervention Mapping.
  • Share suggestions and tips with parents and siblings of self-injuring young people

About the Presenter

Kaye Randall is a nationally known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger — as well as youth leadership and student empowerment. The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named Social Worker of the Year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), and 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children.

Steph Jensen, MS, LPC: Lost Boys: Strategies to Help Educators Navigate the World of Boys for Academic Success!

Monday, July 8, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Boys are held back in school twice as often as girls. Boys also get expelled from preschool nearly five times more often than girls, and they are diagnosed with learning disorders and attention problems at nearly four times the rate of girls. Boys are more likely to dropout of school, and make up only 43 percent of college students. Millions of boys are being lost along the path to academic success and career achievement in today’s knowledge economy. Teacher perceptions regarding behavior, rather than academic performance, penalizes boys as early as kindergarten. On average, boys receive lower behavioral assessment scores, and those scores affect teachers’ overall evaluations of boys’ intelligence and achievement.

Rather than penalize boys’ high energy – as traditional classroom methods often do – successful teachers are learning to take advantage of male liveliness, curiosity and thirst for competition. Unless educators stop to consider whether traditional methods are working for both genders, boys will continue to get the short end of the educational stick.

Award-winning author Stephanie Jensen will help educators understand the structural, chemical and processing differences between boys’ and girls’ brains. This knowledge will help attendees support boys’ developmental needs, while teaching them social /emotional competencies. Attendees will discover innovative strategies, as well as group and individual interventions, to help boys achieve their highest academic potential.
                                                         

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn how to:

  • Explain how boys’ brains work including the chemistry and structure.
  • Identify the differences in the ways girls and boys focus.
  • Recognize the role of hormones, specifically testosterone and dopamine.
  • Demonstrate classroom strategies to support boys’ developmental needs.
  • Contrast the difference between natural aggression and bullying.

About the Presenter

Stephanie Jensen, MS, LPC is an award-winning author and international speaker recognized for her insight and understanding of relational aggression. She combines 15 years of practice in the fields of education and counseling with research, practical strategies and humor to address challenging behaviors and to build positive relationships with students. With experience as a classroom teacher, education consultant and international speaker, she holds a master’s degree in clinical counseling, focusing her efforts on adolescent and family issues.
In recent years, Stephanie has applied her passion for adolescents to focus on the dynamics of relational aggression, social-emotional learning, and positive behavior interventions. She is the author of Thrive in the Hive: Surviving the Girl’s World of Good and Bad Relationship Bee-haviors, Mom’s Choice Award-winning Princess Priscilla and the Bully-Bee Day, Princess Priscilla and the Mood Ring Rainbow and her latest Princess Priscilla and the Great Beezilla!

Kaye Randall, MSW, LISW-CP: Be the Difference: Growth Mindset Strategies for Creating Resiliency, Responsibility and Accountability

Monday, July 8, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Inspiring internal motivation for change with students can be challenging.  Enabling young people to see themselves as the authors of their lives and enabling them to live responsibly with accountability, kindness and compassion are some of the most critical life skills. When students choose a context of growth, they learn that the challenges of life may offer the greatest opportunities for that growth!  This workshop gives specific creative strategies for facilitating and maintaining the growth mindset context specific to the student’s social and emotional learning needs.

      

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn structures to allow students, faculty and staff to be outward-focused, to think about their choices and to realize their contribution in creating the results around them.
  • Understand how to effectively get results by choosing thoughts, feelings and behaviors from a place of ownership — using transformational distinctions of interpretation and context-setting.
  • Apply strategies for dealing with resistance and creating a context for change — both for students and the educators who serve them.
  • Incorporate the “Looks Like/Feels Like” model to help students manifest their natural leadership abilities and access their innate desire for accountability, responsibility, kindness and compassion.
  • Identify a context of healthy power and control.

About the Presenter

Kaye Randall is a nationally known author and speaker who has led professional seminars throughout North America on student mental health, bullying, self-injury, depression, anxiety and anger — as well as youth leadership and student empowerment. The former Training Director for the University of South Carolina Center for Child & Family Studies, Kaye has inspired seminar participants through her practical insights, humor and proactive strategies for helping children and adolescents. She continues to provide clinical services to both children and adolescents and has been named Social Worker of the Year by the Council on Adoptable Children. She is co-author of See My Pain, Creative Strategies & Activities for Helping Young People Who Self-Injure (featured in USA Today), and 102 Creative Strategies for Working with Depressed Children.

Eric Clark M.Ed.: 25 Tech Tools Teachers Can Use to Enhance Engagement

Monday, July 8, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

For educators just getting their feet wet with technology integration to those currently using technology in the classroom, presenter Eric Clark will explore exciting 21st century tech tools that will increase student engagement and bring a wow factor into the classroom. One-to-one computing, BYOD (Bring Your Own Device), Smart Boards and other improvements have revolutionized the technology environment in many North American classrooms. Yet, many educators have lagged behind in incorporating that technology into their instruction resulting in classrooms that are not much different than they were 20 years ago.

In this seminar, Clark will draw upon his experience as a media teacher, media entrepreneur, administrator and master trainer to help teachers sort through tools they might find useful in their classrooms – while opening their minds to other ways to harness technology.

Session Highlights:

  • Poll Everywhere
  • Dropbox
  • TedTalk
  • Livebinders
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • Powtoons
  • Lulu
  • Educreations

Learning Objectives:

In this session, you will learn how to:
•      Discern the value of reverse mentoring in a technology-filled classroom.

  • Discover innovative ways to store and manage lessons, files, and multimedia.
  • Integrate GarageBand and iMovie to create lessons centered on problem-based learning.
  • Learn how to use online video to support lessons rather than sustain them.
  • Identify different tools to help students become authors, producers, and creators of multimedia projects.   

About the Presenter

Eric Clark, M. Ed., is a Certified Master Trainer for Responsibility-Centered Discipline and helped shape the implementation materials for the program. He most recently served as Head of School at a progressive private school in the Midwest. Previously he served as Principal in a public school setting, while also serving as the District Technology Integration Specialist. Eric began his education career teaching English Language Arts, Journalism and Media Communications. Between his other responsibilities, he also launched a thriving publishing company. As an administrator, he has successfully implemented the supportive, non-exclusionary principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline with elementary, middle and high school faculty and students.

Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed., LPC: Girl Drama: Best Practices to Help Educators Reduce Relational Aggression, Cyberbullying & Emotional Violence

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Girl friendships are intense and all-encompassing from early elementary years on; but cliques, power struggles and an intense desire to belong create a ripe field for relational aggression. Describing the emotional milieu girls face as they grow, bestselling author Lisa Damour, Ph.D. reminds us that a girl’s “key support system – her tribe – consists of peers who are also as reactive and erratic as they will ever be. (She) works hard every day to harness powerful and unpredictable emotions so that she can get on with doing everything else she means to do.”

Teachers, counselors and administrators can help guide girls to define what makes a healthy friendship. As a family therapist and Founder of the SistaKeeper organization, Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed., LPC has focused much of her career on working with girls. In this session, she will discuss the impact of social aggression and the factors that motivate relational aggression. She will share tools to develop a trauma-free space to promote girl empowerment. The benefits of gender-specific programming that promotes strength and resiliency in girls will be explored. Discover tools for promoting pro-social behaviors like kindness, sharing and empathy in girls K-12, while improving their attitude toward school and reducing depression.

Learning Objectives:

  • Integrate the latest research-based insights into your bullying and relational aggression prevention program.
  • Identify online communication and social media trends affecting today’s girls.
  • Discover how to instill social/emotional connections among girls.
  • Implement individual, small-group and classroom strategies and activities.
  • Design or revise your own action plan for addressing female relational aggression.

About the Presenter

Tracie Berry-McGhee, M.Ed. LPC, NCC founded the SistaKeeper Empowerment Center in St. Louis 12 years ago with the mission of inspiring and developing the mind, body and spirit of young women. SistaKeeper has since spread to other locations within the United States, as well as to Europe, Africa and the Caribbean.

Tracie continues to serve the community via her private counseling practice, which specializes in women and teen girl issues. She is often called upon to keynote on topics such as conflict resolution, dealing with low self-esteem and bullying. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the Delta Sigma Theta “Power of 22 Award,” the African American Professional Organization of Women “Women of Distinction Award,” the Girls Scouts “Women of Distinction in Social Services Award,” the NAACP “Hometown Champion Award” and the University of Missouri “Outstanding Achievement and Meritorious Service to Education Award.” Tracie is the author of SistaKeeper: Poetry for the Soul, I’m a Keeper and OWN Your NOW.

Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP: Self- Regulation Training: Framework for Success

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

When a student can’t read, we teach him how. When a student struggles with algebra, we give her skills to help. When a student has trouble behaving, what do we do?

Self-Regulation skills can be taught. Not all students have the same ability to regulate emotions, behaviors and responses to difficulties. And those who have not mastered Self-Regulation can be very disruptive to instruction time. When educators include lessons on Self-Regulation as part of the curriculum, everyone can benefit from the training on how to recognize triggers and how to manage responses to them. Rather than trying to modify behavior and/or removing the stimuli that results in unacceptable behavior, Self-Regulation training gives students control over their responses.

During this insightful session Brad Chapin will share strategies that have helped students develop skills necessary for success in academic performance, relationships and overall wellness.  Brad will demonstrate that personal responsibility for behaviors and self-discipline are stronger predictors of academic success than IQ.

Learning Objective:

  •        Engaging approaches to use with individual students and the entire class that you can employ immediately
    •        How to give students the tools to manage their behavior by recognizing triggers and  controlling how they respond
    •        The 3 skill-training areas
    •        To target the core and address a broad spectrum of behaviors and performance issues
    •        How Self-Regulation skills affect social interactions, academic and athletic performance, aggressive behaviors, physical wellness and future happiness and success
    •        How to incorporate Self-Regulation training into your classroom curriculum.

About the Presenter

Brad Chapin is a leading authority on Self-Regulation and a masters level psychologist with a passion for helping others learn the skills necessary for success and happiness. He is a best-selling author and nationally-recognized speaker in the area of Self-Regulation. He has served as the Director of Child and Adult Community Services for a large community mental health center where he supervised 65 mental health field staff. Currently, Brad is Director of Clinical Services for Stormont-Vail Behavioral Health Services. Brad’s first book, Helping Young People Learn Self-Regulation, is in its second printing. He has since published Helping Teens Learn Self-Regulation, The Legend of the Regulators, Teaching Self-Regulation Smart Guidance DVD and the Self-Regulation Training Board. His latest book, Helping Pre-Schoolers Learn Self-Regulation, was released to critical acclaim in 2016.

Sold Out! Brian Mendler: Motivating & Managing Hard to Reach, Uninterested and Disruptive Students

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

From the co-author of the international best-selling book, Discipline with Dignity, this session is loaded with strategies, techniques and ideas designed to prevent motivation and discipline problems in the most difficult classrooms. Discover and practice specific strategies and techniques designed to change attitudes and ignite a passion for success.  This practical, informative session will transform the lives of your most disruptive students.

Objectives:

  • Recognize underlying causes of student misbehavior.
  • Identify 3 places to build relationships.
  • Describe merits of values vs. rules.
  • Demonstrate 8 steps to defusing explosive situations with any student.

About the Presenter

Brian Mendler trains tens of thousands of educators a year and is a highly regarded dynamic speaker. Through his affiliation with Teacher Learning Center, he provides staff development training for K-12 educators and youth service workers throughout the world with a focus on how to be successful with even the most difficult students.

Brian is a certified K-12 and special education teacher with extensive experience working with challenging students in general ed, self-contained and inclusion settings.  In his training sessions and books, he draws on his own experience as a very disruptive student with severe undiagnosed ADHD and reading difficulties.

Brian is the author of several books including That One Kid and The Taming of the Crew.  He has also co-authored Strategies for Successful Classroom Management, Power Struggles 2nd Edition, and the bestseller Discipline With Dignity 3rd Edition: New Challenges, New Solutions.

Rick Shaw: First Preventers’ Playbook: Instrumental Strategies to Create a School Culture of Preventing Safety Issues

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Are you tired of the mounting violence in schools today? Are you scared First Responders/SROs can’t be everywhere and respond fast enough to save your students?  Would you like to know how research-based data proves you can prevent school shootings, violence, bullying, suicides, and other incidents? What if evidence-based data showed you how assets you already have, your First Preventers, can make your school and community safer?

In this session we will share extensive research-based data from real-life incidents/tragedies to show how prevention was and is possible. We will also share how schools with community-wide strategies are successfully preventing incidents, tragedies, and lawsuits by connecting the dots and changing lives and the world forever.

Learning Objectives:

In this session, participants will learn about topics that include, but are not limited to:

Learning Objectives;

  • Identify specific gaps in connecting the pieces of the puzzle
  • Utilize best practices to prevent liability, lawsuits and tragedies
  • Demonstrate the essential steps in intervention and prevention

 

About the Presenter

Rick Shaw is the Founder, CEO and CDO of Awareity Inc. – a developer of innovative, web-based and award-winning prevention platform for students, employees and communities. He has more than 20 years of experience performing numerous types of assessments (threat, compliance, physical, information security, social media and others), with a focus on prevention processes across multiple industries and types of threats. Rick’s experiences – combined with extensive research using post-event reports, lawsuits and surveys – has helped expose the most dangerous disconnects and potential liabilities facing schools (including new threats related to social media).

 

In addition to working with organizational leaders, Rick has been called upon to speak at numerous conferences in the United States, Canada, South Korea and Japan for his expertise in safety (student, employee, third-party, community, etc.) and prevention. He utilizes evidence-based data from hundreds of post-event reports and extensive research to expose each point where proper preventive tactics were possible in most incidents and tragedies.

 

Rick’s passion is student and child safety, and he leads an extensive research effort at Awareity to help educational leaders understand the need for comprehensive and proven prevention solutions to improve student safety and to prevent escalating consequences related to sexual abuse, bullying, cyberbullying, campus violence, suicide, human trafficking, homegrown terrorism and alcohol/drug abuse.

 

Repeat Session! Eric Clark, M.Ed.: Supportive Discipline: Teaching Students to “Own” Their Behaviors

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Many schools fail to see lasting improvement in student behavior because students have not been “encouraged” to accept responsibility for their own actions. Instead students often find ways to project the responsibility for their behaviors to other students — or to their teachers.  This session will help educators to develop a plan, and learn the necessary skills, to create a culture of self-responsibility.

 

Working with difficult, demanding, and disruptive students is not a new challenge for educators. Even well-seasoned, award-winning educators can sometimes “lose their cool” with certain students in certain situations.  Using the principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline, this session will help teachers and administrators identify and address challenging behaviors that negatively affect the academic and behavioral progress of the students with whom they work. This insight-filled workshop will provide you with up-to-date insights and strategies for reaching and helping students who evoke the strongest feelings of frustration and sometimes discouragement, in professional educators.                                                                               

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn to:
•          Identify the underlying causes of difficult behaviors in students

  • Implement do’s and don’ts to address specific behaviors
  • Integrate key strategies for migrating from an obedience-centered approach to a responsibility-centered approach
  • Develop innovative ways to support positive behavior
  • Apply strategies for preventing the escalation of difficult behavior

 

About the Presenter

Eric Clark, M. Ed., is a Certified Master Trainer for Responsibility-Centered Discipline and helped shape the implementation materials for the program. He most recently served as Head of School at a progressive private school in the Midwest. Previously he served as Principal in a public school setting, while also serving at the District Technology Integration Specialist. Eric began his education career teaching English Language Arts, Journalism and Media Communications. Between his other responsibilities, he also launched a thriving publishing company. As an administrator, he has successfully implemented the supportive, non-exclusionary principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline with elementary, middle and high school faculty and students.

 

 

Repeat Session! Brad Chapin, MS, LCP, LMLP: Self- Regulation Training: Framework for Success

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

When a student can’t read, we teach him how. When a student struggles with algebra, we give her skills to help. When a student has trouble behaving, what do we do?

Self-Regulation skills can be taught. Not all students have the same ability to regulate emotions, behaviors and responses to difficulties. And those who have not mastered Self-Regulation can be very disruptive to instruction time. When educators include lessons on Self-Regulation as part of the curriculum, everyone can benefit from the training on how to recognize triggers and how to manage responses to them. Rather than trying to modify behavior and/or removing the stimuli that results in unacceptable behavior, Self-Regulation training gives students control over their responses.

During this insightful session Brad Chapin will share strategies that have helped students develop skills necessary for success in academic performance, relationships and overall wellness.  Brad will demonstrate that personal responsibility for behaviors and self-discipline are stronger predictors of academic success than IQ.

Learning Objective:

  •        Engaging approaches to use with individual students and the entire class that you can employ immediately
    •        How to give students the tools to manage their behavior by recognizing triggers and  controlling how they respond
    •        The 3 skill-training areas
    •        To target the core and address a broad spectrum of behaviors and performance issues
    •        How Self-Regulation skills affect social interactions, academic and athletic performance, aggressive behaviors, physical wellness and future happiness and success
    •        How to incorporate Self-Regulation training into your classroom curriculum.

About the Presenter

Brad Chapin is a leading authority on Self-Regulation and a masters level psychologist with a passion for helping others learn the skills necessary for success and happiness. He is a best-selling author and nationally-recognized speaker in the area of Self-Regulation. He has served as the Director of Child and Adult Community Services for a large community mental health center where he supervised 65 mental health field staff. Currently, Brad is Director of Clinical Services for Stormont-Vail Behavioral Health Services. Brad’s first book, Helping Young People Learn Self-Regulation, is in its second printing. He has since published Helping Teens Learn Self-Regulation, The Legend of the Regulators, Teaching Self-Regulation Smart Guidance DVD and the Self-Regulation Training Board. His latest book, Helping Pre-Schoolers Learn Self-Regulation, was released to critical acclaim in 2016.

Robert Jackson: Salvaging Our Sons: Helping Educators Reach, Teach and Empower Young Men

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Session Description Coming Soon!

Sold Out! Eric Clark, M.Ed.: Supportive Discipline: Teaching Students to “Own” Their Behaviors

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Many schools fail to see lasting improvement in student behavior because students have not been “encouraged” to accept responsibility for their own actions. Instead students often find ways to project the responsibility for their behaviors to other students — or to their teachers.  This session will help educators to develop a plan, and learn the necessary skills, to create a culture of self-responsibility.

 

Working with difficult, demanding, and disruptive students is not a new challenge for educators. Even well-seasoned, award-winning educators can sometimes “lose their cool” with certain students in certain situations.  Using the principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline, this session will help teachers and administrators identify and address challenging behaviors that negatively affect the academic and behavioral progress of the students with whom they work. This insight-filled workshop will provide you with up-to-date insights and strategies for reaching and helping students who evoke the strongest feelings of frustration and sometimes discouragement, in professional educators.                                                                               

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn to:
•          Identify the underlying causes of difficult behaviors in students

  • Implement do’s and don’ts to address specific behaviors
  • Integrate key strategies for migrating from an obedience-centered approach to a responsibility-centered approach
  • Develop innovative ways to support positive behavior
  • Apply strategies for preventing the escalation of difficult behavior

 

About the Presenter

Eric Clark, M. Ed., is a Certified Master Trainer for Responsibility-Centered Discipline and helped shape the implementation materials for the program. He most recently served as Head of School at a progressive private school in the Midwest. Previously he served as Principal in a public school setting, while also serving at the District Technology Integration Specialist. Eric began his education career teaching English Language Arts, Journalism and Media Communications. Between his other responsibilities, he also launched a thriving publishing company. As an administrator, he has successfully implemented the supportive, non-exclusionary principles of Responsibility-Centered Discipline with elementary, middle and high school faculty and students.

 

 

Sold Out! Susan Coleman, Ph.D.: Stay Classy! Using Social Emotional Learning Competencies to Create Alternatives to Suspensio

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Session Description Coming Soon!

Mike Paget, M.Ed.: Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Insights and Strategies that will Improve Outcomes for Students with ODD, Conduct Disorders and Intermittent Explosive Disorder

Tuesday, July 9, 2019, 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Between 2 and 16% of students have behaviors that disrupt their day, the efforts of their teachers, and the focus of their peers. This session will review where these patterns come from, what makes them worse, and strategies to provide a calmer, more productive school climate.                                                               

Learning Objectives:
In this session, you will learn how to:

  • Learn what’s wrong with these students. Understand where resistant, defiant, hostile, manipulative, aggressive, and hurtful behaviors come from.
  • Common tactics that escalate negative behaviors.
  • Keeping your cool: How to prevent and respond in ways that improve your chances
  • Moving from problem to asset: Strategies to find and nurture hidden strengths in the most challenging student

About the Presenter

Mike Paget has over 25 years experience working as a “teacher-therapist”, special education teacher, director of clinical day program services, and state department of education consultant for emotional, behavioral, mental health issues, crisis de-escalation and prevention, and positive behavior supports.

Mike has biases; he believes that the most important “treatment” is a day during which a young person learns some new things, laughs with close friends, and contributes to making the day a bit better for classmates and community. He believes that teachers and parents are the primary facilitators for getting these things done.

Mike is now an independent trainer and consultant on topics related to emotional, behavioral, and mental health issues of students. He conducts workshops, seminars, and webinars across the United States and Canada.

Mike is the co-author of several books including:

Aggressive and Violent StudentsDefying the Defiance: 131 Insights, Strategies, Lessons and Activities for Helping Students with ODD, and High on the Spectrum: Asperger’s, High-Functioning Autism & Related Personalities

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